Hippo Thinks | Our Successes
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“Inside the Starburst-Shaped Box That Could Save the Internet,”

produced for the Department of Homeland Security and placed in TechCrunch.

The Problem

Government labs are constantly creating incredibly cool technology — but nobody knows they’re doing it. The Los Alamos National Laboratory is a perfect example of this. This is the lab where the mind-blowing quantum RNG was produced (that is, the “starburst-shaped box that could save the internet”), and yet people hear the lab’s name and think only of building nukes. A traditional PR approach would have required a PR agent to convince a journalist to write an 800-word piece entirely about this obscure subject — a challenge, to say the least.

The Solution

This piece’s title conjures up sci-fi tech and superheros, but the research that backs it up is even more fascinating. We took a daunting topic — a device that utilizes fluctuating quantum light field to produce random numbers — and turned it into something digestible yet authoritative, maintaining the strong expert voice of our government client.

How It Performed

engage

2,710 engagements

fb

1,579 shares and likes

in

664 shares

“Hippo Reads was great to work with on the pieces we wrote about cybersecurity technology. They made it very easy to put together articles that discuss complex topics in a manner that non-cyber experts could understand—which is something that many people struggle with. This was important for us given the ever growing importance of cybersecurity. We gained quite a bit of exposure from the article that Hippo Reads placed in TechCrunch, which was our primary goal in working with them. I’m extremely satisfied with the partnership that was formed with Hippo Reads.”

 

— Michael Pozmantier, former program manager for the Transition to Practice (TTP) program in Cyber Security Division (CSD) at DHS S&T

“Finding the Silver Lining in Zero-Based Budgeting,” produced for Flite and placed in Ad Age by Flite’s PR rep.

The Problem

Flite was hoping to gain the trust of marketing executives at large corporations, and to achieve this, they needed to come across like the experts they are. Though zero-based budgeting was only tangentially related to Flite’s actual business (an adtech platform), the topic was particularly timely because Unilever had just switched to zero-based budgeting for their marketing, and everyone was talking about it.

The Solution

The tips in the article send a reassuring message that Flite has a deep understanding of this field and knows how to solve marketers’ problems, whether the problems are within Flite’s official purview or not. In other words, this piece make themselves look like a great partner for a marketing department. The actual voice of the piece — lightly humorous, clear, and absorbable — helped the piece place in a prestigious publication, and captured a readership’s attention, too.

How It Performed

engage

1,534 engagements

fb

1,048 shares and likes

in

387 shares

“Tackling zero-based budgeting, a fairly esoteric topic within the advertising industry, the Hippo Reads team was able to produce a piece of easily-digestible content that transcended the common conversations, and helped us land a valuable piece of thought leadership in one of our key trades, Advertising Age.

 

From start to finish, the process working with the Hippo team was easy and painless. They created a logical outline, asked the right questions, were open to feedback and tweaks, and delivered a thoughtful article.”

 

— Scott Lahde, Marketing Consultant, Flite

Selected Publications

To Sell More Smartphones, Change How They’re Bought and Sold

Huffington Post

 

An estimated 75% of new mobile subscriptions in the first quarter of 2015 came from the Asia-Pacific region and Africa. Yet customers in these markets don’t have the resources to buy what Sony, Apple, and other big smartphones manufacturers are selling.

Print

Filling Business Taxes for the First Time? Don’t Panic

AllBusiness

 

The words “tax time” are enough to get many first-time entrepreneurs’ hearts racing.

Print

Finding the Silver Lining in Zero-Basesd Budgeting

Ad Age

 

For a smart marketing team with proper support from upper management, zero-based budgeting can be an opportunity to jump start enormous growth.

Print

EdTech Will Reach Its Full Potential in Public Schools, Not Charters

EdSurge

 

In the journey towards successfully implementing educational technology in classrooms, the tortise may outpace the hare.

Print

Sensor Tech Isn’t Ready to Power the Wearable Internet

VentureBeat

 

Even more than smartphones have, this internet “skin” will erode the boundary between human and machine, merging your body with your computer.

Print

Inside The Starburst-Sized Box That Could Save the Internet

TechCrunch

 

Inside a device the size of a starburst candy is a crazily fluctuating quantum light field – the quickest and most reliable true random number generator ever made.

Print

Why Startups Need More People Over 50

Fast Company

 

Older workers have a wealth of knowledge and expertise. So why are they often discriminated against in hiring?

Print

The Next Facebook Won’t Be From Silicon Valley

Forbes

 

Why Chinese internet giants like Alibaba and Tencent are about to breakinto the international stage.

Print

Is The Start-Up Culture Derailing the MBA?

Recode

 

A punchy piece that explores the new reality of MBA culture amidst the start-up revolution.

Print

Why You Should Skip the Password and Try These Things Instead

Entrepreneur

 

A practical explanations of why the increasing reliance on traditional means of data security is actually making information less secure.

Print

Hippo Reads

They also publish in Hippo Reads, an online magazine that strives to unite real-world issues and academic thought. Reads publishes what have been called “TED talks for readers” – engaging, pithy pieces that make cutting-edge research accessible without dumbing it down.